29
Sep 10

A brief argument to bring back Ken Macha

Buster Olney said this past week that "unless there is a last-hour change of heart on the part of the Brewers, Manager Ken Macha will not be retained." Is this the right move?

Here's a few facts about Ken Macha and managers in general:

  • Ken Macha does a pretty good job with the bullpen.
  • It wasn't Ken Macha's fault that the pitching was terrible.
  • It wasn't his fault last year either.
  • The offense has remained one of the best in the league.
  • There have been no public feuds with any of the players or among any of the players.
  • Despite what some Kameron Loe fans may say, he's been very good at protecting pitchers.
  • Too much credit is given to managers for a team's success or lack thereof.
  • A great manager is, at best, worth about two extra wins a year.

These are all true things. I didn't just make them up. They are reason enough to give Ken Macha another chance, but they are not why I am arguing to bring him back. The reason I think the Brewers should consider bringing back Ken Macha is this:

Teams with interim managers

Arizona Diamondbacks
Chicago Cubs
Florida Marlins
Seattle Mariners

Teams with managers who are retiring at the end of the season (and are yet to name a replacement)

Atlanta Braves
Toronto Blue Jays

Team that is likely to fire its manager before next season

New York Mets

Team that should fire its manager before next season

St. Louis Cardinals

Team that could have its manager leave because of contract expiry

New York Yankees

Team that question mark

Chicago White Sox

That's ten (eleven if you count the Brewers) teams that could be looking for a new manager this offseason and a lot of those jobs look at lot more attractive to a perspective manager than the Milwaukee Brewers. A few of these teams are larger markets with rich baseball histories. Seattle has better sushi. Toronto is located in Canada. Florida has the best cocaine. Milwaukee is Milwaukee. There is going to be a lot of competition for managers and the best of them are likely not to come to Milwaukee. (That being said, if they were the best they would probably already have a job.) We might not be the first choice of the guy we want.

So what exactly is the point of getting a different person to do the same thing that Ken Macha already does? Or worse, what is the point of getting rid of Macha and hiring someone who does a worse job than he does? If the team wanted to fire him they should have done it back in May when it might have ignited the team or at least inspired the fanbase. Who cares now?

You can't blame Macha for the team's success because he's done the best that he could with what he had. He didn't have any pitching and you can't win with an incomplete team. The team has played hard all season long with no obvious signs of quitting like you see a lot of other teams doing this time of year. I don't think you can fire him based on results and if you can't do that, why fire him at all?

Ghost of Miller Park Drunk's Past says:

Because he batted Corey Patterson leadoff, that's why. Don't you remember? He batted Corey Patterson in the leadoff spot. COREY PATTERSON! ARE YOU F'N KIDDING ME!?

You know one of the things that old school people will say is "at the end of the season, players always hit what's on the back of their baseball card." I would consider Ken Macha to be an old school guy. Therefore, what does he see on the back of this baseball card that I don't? Because all I can see is mediocrity.

Now, it's not so much that he batted Corey Patterson leadoff that has me calling for his head. I mean on it's own that is pretty indefensible, but you could make a rather poor case for it without Hart, Cameron or Braun playing. What really pissed me off though was his use of him in the ninth inning of Monday's game. Namely, he let him bat when Ryan Braun was available.

In the eighth, Braun stepped into the on-deck circle to bat for the pitcher, but ended up not getting to bat. (You can't make the argument that he wasn't available because he was pretty clearly ready to bat in that inning.) Then in the ninth, that pinch hitting spot was taken by Craig Counsell who promptly drew a walk. Now with a runner on first with nobody out and down by only three, what would you do? Call on the best hitter not in the game, Ryan Braun, to pinch hit? The second best, Mike Cameron? The third best? Yovani? Well, if you are Ken Macha you let the absolute worst hitter on your team and quite possibly in all of baseball swing away and ground into a game defining, might as well be game ending double play.

And then after being completely hopeless in that leadoff spot, what does Macha do? BAT HIM LEAD OFF AGAIN THE NEXT DAY.

There is no forgiving rape and there is definitely not any forgiveness for child molesters, but batting Corey Patterson leadoff? ABSOLUTELY NO FORGIVENESS.

Fire this idiot.

Oh. Yeah. Forgot about that. Well..

Suck it Macha!


16
Sep 10

Teams as Stereotypical Pictures

Inspired by Lookout Landing's excellent Teams Offenses as Players post, Miller Park Drunk presents to you Teams as Stereotypical Pictures! Each team is accompanied by a picture that stereotypes their city, team or fanbase. This should be fun. Continue reading →


14
Sep 10

Announcement: What the Bucks

You may have noticed a lack of posting in the past couple weeks here. There are a couple of reasons for this. For one, we're still nursing a hangover from the Pants Party. (Have I mentioned how awesome that was? Check out the photo album!) The other main thing that has been slowing us down is our development of a spinoff website. That's right, Miller Park Drunk is getting it's own Joey. Never again will you have to worry about "Bradley Center Drunk" lurking his head around these parts again because we now have our very own Bucks blogs.

(*waits for applause*)

(*gives up*)

I'm sure you have questions so we will attempt to answer them here. Continue reading →


13
Sep 10

MPD Book Review: How to Finish Near Last Place with the Highest Payroll in the League

When the press release for Jim Hendry's new book How to Finish Near Last Place with the Highest Payroll in the League was first circulated through the Miller Park press box this past weekend it was widely thought to be a hoax by someone attempting to be funny and probably not an all together good attempt at that. So imagine our surprise when in our inbox we received a copy of the new book for review. It's not nearly long (or good) enough to write a lengthy review on and at times we had trouble reading the Comic Sans font the book was written in, but it is... interesting and is probably the closest we'll ever get to an "inside view" of the general manager position by an acting (for now) GM.

The book opens with a foreword by Lou Piniella that starts off nice enough thanking Jim Hendry for the opportunity to write for the foreword and also to manage Cubs, but after about two sentences it quickly devolves into an airing of grievances against everyone in baseball who has ever slighted him. By the last paragraph every sentence is typed in all-caps with multiple profanities interlaced within. The foreword ends, tellingly perhaps, with Piniella writing:

AND F*CK YOU TOO STEVE STONE LETS SEE YOU MANAGE A F*CKING TEAM.

HOPE YOU ENJOY THEĀ  F*CKING BOOK, BUT I'M NOT GONNA F*CKING READ IT.

Surprisingly when Hendry takes over the book doesn't change very much in tone from Piniella's foreword. Each chapter addresses a common complaint among fans about his work with an impassioned defense of the move followed by a "summary" of the point he was trying to make. While it may sound unnecessary, it is very helpful as Hendry has trouble making his points and often loses sight of the original topic by going into tangents about those "a-holes in the bleachers" and various local radio DJs.

I won't spoil all of the summaries, but I will cover a few of the ones that were leaked in the press release. Continue reading →


08
Sep 10

Trevor Hoffman saves number 600

Last night Trevor Hoffman saved his 600th game of his career. This is a big number, a number few will ever reach, and on it's own is very impressive. Trevor Hoffman has had a great career and he deserved to make it to this point. He was a great reliever, highly above average, every season of his career except for this one. I am happy for him. Good for you, Trevor. You worked hard to get to this point and you should enjoy it. You are truly one of the best closers of all time and it couldn't have happened to a nicer guy.

Now go away.

I didn't watch last night's game or go to it (despite having free tickets) because as my good friend Tyler Maas pointed out to me on facebook, Sons of Anarchy was on!

Awesome start to Sons tonight. I have no regrets that I watched that instead of seeing some guy get a meaningless amount of whatever at some place.

Do you know how long that show has been on hiatus? Nine months! Do you know how massive my blue balls for this show were? Plus, it's not like this game was going to somehow catapult the Brewers back into contention. I'm glad they won because screw the Cardinals and I guess in some twisted way I am happy that number 600 came against the same team that made us realize that Trevor Hoffman wasn't a good pitcher anymore. I mean, who could forget April 9th when Hoffman gave up the homerun to a guy on one knee? Or April 11th when Hoffman blew it and Casey bailed him out. These were defining moments of his season whether we realized it or not.

The truth is the season is lost and a moment like yesterday can be looked at as a lone bright spot in a long, crappy season. That's nice and maybe next year we can get a HOFFMAN 600 bobblehead, but it still doesn't change the fact that the season could have worked out completely different if Trevor Hoffman didn't singlehandedly lose 5 games before June 2nd. Let's try and keep some perspective here, we're not a bunch of Padres fans who deserve to be blindly happy about this. We're Brewers fans who saw a guy get his 600th save in a career that didn't affect us much.

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